Women in journalism: Reading list 1/20/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Professor: Media coverage of rape often missing meaningful discussion (KU News Release)

Who Needs Feminist Media? Answers from Short-Essay Contest Winners (Ms. blog)

Coverage of Social Issues Among To Newspapers – Election 2012 (4thEstate.net)

A Salute to Girl Power in Hollywood (New York Times)

Lara Setrakian: Single-story sites like Syria Deeply have lessons to offer the rest of the news business (Nieman Journalism Lab)

Somali journalist arrested after interviewing rape victim (Guardian)

Ethiopian journalist Reeyot Alemu loses appeal, remains in prison (International Women’s Media Foundation)

Middletown Press reporter Lauren Sievert assaulted outside Connecticut courthouse (Poynter)

Abandoned Babies & Terrible Mothers: Media Coverage Bias (BlogHer)

Nigella Lawson Tells ABC They Can’t Airbush Her Tummy For Promo Poster (BuzzFeed)

‘Dear Abby’ advice columnist Pauline Friedman Phillips dies at age 94 (AP)

Ellen Weiss To Head Scripps DC News Bureau (TV News Check)

N.Y. Times’ Alice DuBois leaves for BuzzFeed (Politico)

Joyce Wadler Takes NY Times Buyout (New York Observer)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

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Women in journalism: Reading list 11/11/2012

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

And the award for sexist pig goes to…Feminist media watchdogs gave out awards for sexist campaign coverage (Columbia Journalism Review)

Ladies Be Publishing: Women Dominate NaNoWriMo (Jezebel)

Sudanese journalist [Somaya Ibrahim Ismail Hundosa] found after being abducted, tortured (Committee to Protect Journalists)

Megyn Kelly Can Save Fox News (The New Republic)

NABJ Member Sarah Hoye To Receive The Women’s Media Center’s Carol Jenkins Award (NABJ)

After four years overseeing “Morning Edition,” Madhulika Sikka will soon be directing NPR’s news operations (American Journalism Review)

WSJ’s Liz Heron Seeks Expanded Audience Through Social Media (Contently)

Times Public Editor Margaret ‘The Slugger’ Sullivan Comes Out Swinging (New York Observer)

Q&A: Caitlin Moran tells it like it is (Columbia Journalism Review)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list 9/2/2012

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Political Coverage

The Women’s Media Center and The 4th Estate Project partnered to release new findings on the gender gap in political coverage. According to an analysis of coverage of the 2012 presidential election at 35 newspapers, men wrote 76 percent of articles during the GOP primary period (Jan. 1 to April 15) and 72 percent of the articles during the general election period thus far (April 16 to Aug. 25). Here are related articles and the press release from the Women’s Media Center:

Three-Quarters of Newspapers’ Presidential Coverage is Written by Men (Women’s Media Center)

Men are Telling the Stories of Election 2012 (4thEstate.net)

-Male Journalists May Dominate Campaign Coverage, But Look What Women Write About (XX Factor)

Three-Quarters Of The Presidential News You Read Is Written By Men (Forbes Woman)

General Interest Links

Don’t posit ‘what women think’ without quoting any (Columbia Journalism Review)

RNC Attendee Allegedly Threw Nuts At Black CNN Camerawoman, Said ‘This Is How We Feed Animals’ (Talking Points Memo)

CNN Camerawoman [Patricia Carroll] On Harassment At RNC: ‘I hate that it happened, but I’m not surprised at all’ (TV Newser)

Spanish Magazine Depicts Michelle Obama As A Slave (Think Progress)

‘Good Girls’ Tells of Women’s Fight for Rights at Newsweek (New York Times)

On the frontline with female reporters (The Media Online)

“Our World, My Voice: GlobalGirls Talk Politics” Blog Campaign (Global Girl Media)

-Is Sexual Violence on TV OK if the Heroine Is Tough? (XX Factor)

The Feministing Five: Rose Aguilar (Feministing)

Robin Roberts Moves Last Day on “GMA” Before Medical Leave to Thursday (ABC News)

Wendy Warren leaves Philly.com for NBCWashington.com (Poynter)

Patch loses communications director Janine Iamunno (JimRomenesko.com)

Sullivan says goodbye to Buffalo News to become NYT ombud (Poynter)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

In the Spotlight: Q&A with the 4th Estate

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of posts featuring organizations working on issues related to gender representations in the news. View other posts in this series here.

Silenced: Gender Gap in the 2012 Election Coverage by the 4th Estate (Click to go to the site for more)

The 4th Estate released the report “Silenced: Gender Gap in the 2012 Election Coverage” last week. The report (see graphic) shows that even on topics related to women, very few of the sources quoted are, in fact, women.

The study showed that on topics such as abortion, birth control and Planned Parenthood, women are only 12 to 26 percent of quoted sources. Women are seen more often in women’s rights stories but still represent slightly less than one-third of quoted sources.

The study received attention following an article in The Daily Beast (Disclosure: I’m quoted along with fellow Gender Report co-founder Joy Bacon). Subsequently other media outlets and blogs picked up on the study and graphic, including The Atlantic (which also named it “infographic of the day“), Huffington Post, Slate’s XX Factor, and others.

To get to know a bit more about the organization behind this study, we spoke Michael Howe of the 4th Estate project via email about the work the organization is doing to analyze news coverage of the 2012 election, including the representation of women among quoted sources. Here’s what he had to say:

1. For those unfamiliar with your work, give us your elevator pitch — What is the 4th Estate?

The 4th Estate is mapping the public social influence of the media and newsmakers around the presidential election; so from a journalism point of view we see this as a means to raise the quality of the questions that we ask, hopefully in a manner that improves the understanding people have about the media information they are consuming.

2. What made you interested in looking at the gender gap in election coverage specifically?

Although it appears that we have come out of the blue, the technology behind the 4th Estate has been deployed for almost a decade. The 4th Estate team has been using the platform and the core methodology to perform behavioral and media intelligence work for a wide range of corporate and political clients. Over the course of these years, the technology behind the methodology has continuously improved. At this point, the technology is able to measure and visualize thousands of patterns in traditional and social news – gender being just one.

The 4th Estate team has been aware of the gender gap in sourcing for some time. When we started doing our work on the election, we figured this pattern would be present, and it was. The data matched our data from numerous previous projects covering a variety of domains and subject matters. We have seen these patterns repeatedly.

3. What do you consider to be the biggest issue when it comes to the representation of women in journalism?

We feel very unqualified to answer this question. As we mentioned above, we look for patterns and relationships within data in general – we were definitely not looking for gender data specifically. It popped out as a very noticeable pattern. As mentioned earlier, we have seen the gender gap in other data sets, not just within Election 2012 coverage.

It felt like it was important data to put into the public forum. But beyond publishing the findings, I don’t think we are comfortable interpreting these results. It really is for the public at large to debate what the results mean.

4. How is your organization a part of the solution?

The 4th Estate is not an advocacy organization. I have great respect for people doing advocacy work, but that is not what we are doing. We are examining trends, measuring changes, and bringing these observations to the public’s attention with visual representations. Our goal is to build a widely accessible tool that is performing real time parsing of news coverage across many domains, so people will be able to monitor and analyze on a continuous basis those topics that are of interest to them. We realize our data might be important for a variety of advocacy groups, but we believe our greatest value is in providing quantitative data and letting more qualified content experts make sense of that data.

5. What project are you currently working on that you’re most excited about? Share a little bit about it.

The building and designing of the 4th Estate project into a viable sustainable ongoing venture! In the short term, we are focused on election coverage, but there is so much untapped potential in the technology to explore and parse how large-scale societal issue after issue is being covered.

6. What else do you think is important for our readers to know about you?

We believe our data should be viewed as the beginning of a discussion, not the end of one. It should be a door, an opening, to a continuing discussion, not used as a hammer to ‘win’ an argument. We love information and putting it into a context that is relevant for decision makers.

Find out more about the 4th Estate by visiting its website at www.4thestate.net. Follow the organization on twitter @4thEstateVoices and “like” it on Facebook here.

Are you a member of an organization that looks to address issues of gender representation in the news? Contact us about being our next “In the Spotlight” organization by e-mailing genderreport[@[gmail.com.

Gender check: 1/4/12 – Northeast

*Gender Checks are quick examinations of gender representation in individual news articles for the purpose of discovering trends over time. Click here to read more.

Website: The New York Times

On The New York Times, one of the lead articles featured on the home page as of 8:40 p.m. (PST) Wednesday, Jan. 4, was titled “Romney Takes a Victory Lap as Santorum Plays Catch-Up.” Its subject was the GOP presidential candidate race.

Here is its gender breakdown:

Author: Male (2)

Human sources  (listed in order mentioned):

  1. Male, GOP candidate
  2. Male, GOP candidate
  3. Male, campaign manager
  4. Male, who runs a super PAC
  5. Male, money manager
  6. Male, GOP candidate
  7. Male, GOP candidate
  8. Male, president of conservative group
  9. Male, president of conservative group


Website: ProPublica

On ProPublica, one of the lead articles featured on the home page as of 8:40 p.m. (PST) Wednesday, Jan. 4, was titled “Our Guide to the Best Coverage on Rick Santorum and His Record.” Its subject was round-up of coverage on one of the GOP presidential candidates.

Here is its gender breakdown:

Author:  Female

Human sources  (listed in order mentioned):

  1. Male, GOP candidate

Notes/analysis: The guide mainly quotes and cites other articles and coverage.