Women in journalism: Reading list for 12/8/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Almost two-thirds of women journalists have experienced abuse and harassment – INSI/IWMF global survey (International News Safety Institute)

Global research project investigates violence against women journalists (International Women’s Media Foundation)

For many women journalists, workplaces are dangerous, study says (Poynter)

Most Female Journalists Have Been Threatened, Assaulted, or Harassed at Work. Here’s Why We Don’t Talk About It. (XX Factor)

-VIDEO: How the Media Failed Women in 2013 (Represent Project)

Women of Vision: An intimate view of the world through the eyes of 11 female photographers (PBS News Hour Art Beat)

The Woman in the Breast Cancer Photo Responds to Times Readers (New York Times Public Editor)

Africa: Women Demand Access to New Technologies and Decision-Making (AllAfrica)

Why Newsrooms Need More Women in Technology Roles (PBS MediaShift)

5 Ways Female Filmmakers Will Revolutionize Hollywood (PolicyMic)

Disney has some new heroines: Female directors (The Independent)

The women of Fleet Street are about to claim their place at journalism’s top table. It’s about time, too (The Independent)

Twitter Appoints Marjorie Scardino as First Female Board Member (New York Times Bits Blog)

Her ‘Time’ (Capital New York) On Nancy Gibbs

Carolyn Ryan Aims To ‘Unleash’ The New York Times Washington Bureau (Huffington Post)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list 3/3/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Don’t blame the victim, or the photographer (Salon)

Salacious, voyeuristic, insensitive: How the media harms one survivor of rape (Women Under Siege)

Speaking out about sexual violence (Ottawa Citizen)

‘Said to Lady Journos’ Tumblr is ‘depressingly relatable,’ female journalists say. Related: Meet the lady behind the ‘Said to Lady Journos’ Tumblr (Poynter)

Dealing with harassment and sexism (Columbia Journalism Review)

Online Misogynists Are Not Fringe Characters (Raw Story)

House of Cads: The psycho-sexual ordeal of reporting in Washington (New Republic)

Launching Voices of Our Future Training Program 2013 (World Pulse)

New documentary honors women who paved the way (Daily Beast) On MAKERS: Women Who Make America. Watch the documentary online here.

Where were today’s digital feminists in ‘Women Who Make America’? (Guardian)

More Women Needed Behind and in Front of the Camera (by Julie Burton)

Good News for Female Magazine Editors: The Pay Gap Is Narrowing (XX Factor)

Mary J. Corey, first woman to lead Sun newsroom, dies of cancer (Baltimore Sun)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

CDC releases study on rape and domestic violence

A national study released this week revealed the prevalence of rape, sexual assault and domestic violence in the United States as well as the effects and health consequences of these experiences.

The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey was done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and was supported by the National Institute of Justice and the Department of Defense. The study itself involved a telephone survey in 2010 of more than 16,500 adults. The report is thought to help guide and target prevention efforts.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the findings of a survey on rape and domestic violence this week. Click the image to view the report or executive summary.

Some of the report’s key numbers related to U.S. adults included:

  • Overall, more than one in three women and one in four men reported having experienced rape, physical violence or stalking by an intimate partner at some point in their lives.
  • One in five women and one in 71 men said they had been raped or experienced an attempted rape during their lifetime. More than half of female victims reported being raped by an intimate partner and another nearly 41 percent by an acquaintance. More than half of male victims also reported being raped by an acquaintance.
  • One in six women and one in 19 men have been stalked at some point in their lives.
  • One in four women and one in seven men reported having experienced “severe physical violence” by an intimate partner.

Additionally, findings focused on the impact of intimate partner violence, a look at these issues by race and ethnicity, violence in the last 12 months and health consequences for victims.

Many news outlets and online news sites picked up on the release of the survey results and reported on the findings. Stories focused on different aspects of the survey’s results. Stories also tended to either point out how “shocking,” “surprising” or “disturbing” these findings were or, in contrast, to point out that the study’s findings were not news. Those who stated the latter usually did credit the survey for confirming the prevalence of these issues and discrediting myths surrounding these topics, such as the idea that most rapes are perpetrated by strangers. These differences in emphasis and interpretation are most clearly demonstrated in the titles of the articles below:

Read an executive summary of the survey or the full report here.

This is the Gender Report’s Week in Review, a weekly post that highlights some of the major stories related to gender issues this week. Some of these stories may have already appeared in our News Feed or in the week’s Gender Checks. We’ll at times include a longer analysis of stories as well as bring attention to stories that may have slipped through the cracks of the week’s news cycle.

Gender check: 5/19/11 – Midwest

*Gender Checks are quick examinations of gender representation in individual news articles for the purpose of discovering trends over time. Click here to read more.

Website: St. Louis Post-Dispatch (stltoday.com)

On Stltoday.com, one of the lead articles featured on the home page as of noon (PST) Thursday, May 19, was titled “Man shoots wife, kills teen girl and shoots self in St. Louis domestic dispute.” Its subject was a man shooting his wife, her teen daughter and then himself. The girl died of her wounds while her mother and the man are still in critical condition.

Here is its gender breakdown:

Author: Male and female, dual byline

Human sources  (listed in order mentioned):

1. Male, police lt.

2. Female, neighbor

Notes/analysis: The incident is a breaking news situation that is still developing. The story notes that a young boy is also a member of the household but was at school at the time. It’s unclear whether the man was the girl’s father or step-father.


Website: St. Louis Beacon

On the St. Louis Beacon, one of the lead articles featured on the home page as of noon (PST) Thursday, May 19, was titled “MSD rates are set to go up, one way or another.” Its subject was upcoming rate increases from the sewer district.

Here is its gender breakdown:

Author: Male

Human sources  (listed in order mentioned):

1. Male, executive director

Notes/analysis: The story mostly cites “officials” with the MSD or just the district as the source.