Women in journalism: Reading list for 8/25/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Why there’s no female Nate Silver (Salon)

Men, women, and media empire-building (by Ann Friedman)

The women’s pages: The upsides and downsides of starting your career in gender-specific digital media (Columbia Journalism Review) Also by Ann Friedman

Police say female photographer, 23, gang-raped in Mumbai (CNN)

The IWMF Launches Global Survey On Dangers For Women In News (International Women’s Media Foundation)

Editor Tries to Mansplain Gender Disparity, Fails Miserably (The Atlantic Wire)

Marissa Mayer and Sheryl Sandberg aren’t the only fierce women in tech (Venture Beat)

Can These Students Fix Wikipedia’s Lady Problem? (Mother Jones)

Women Contributors Still Face Hurdles at Wikipedia (WSJ)

How two young journalists are highlighting longform journalism written by women (Poynter)

Young female journalists: here’s your opportunity to shine (The Telegraph)

The 100 Best Websites For Women, 2013 (Forbes)

Q&A: Aerogram Founder, Lakshmi Gandhi (ReportHers)

A Q&A With Jill Abramson: The Times’ top editor on mean bosses, liberal biases, and the demise of the Washington Post (New Republic)

Lauren Ashburn Joins Fox News (Huffington Post)

Why is Chrystia Freeland leaving journalism to run for office? (Washington Post)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

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Women in journalism: Reading list 1/27/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Inaugural diversity: When the media employs the term, what does it mean? (Columbia Journalism Review)

Sundance Institute and Women in Film Release Unprecedented Study on Women Directors (Women in Hollywood)

The hidden side of women’s military service: sexual assault (Columbia Journalism Review)

How Some Men Harass Women Online and What Other Men Can Do to Stop It (Ms Magazine Blog)

Broadcasting’s gender imbalance is inexcusable after Expert Women’s Day (Guardian)

Hillary Clinton’s Benghazi Testimony and the Men Who Fear Her (BlogHer)

In Te’o interview, Couric shows value of follow-up questions (Poynter)

What the Manti Te’o Scandal Reveals About Women in Journalism (Huffington Post)

How a princess can help Saudi women find their voice (CS Monitor)

Council Candidate Balks at Campaign Finance Questions From ‘Pretty Girl’ (DNAinfo.com)

Iranian journalist Masih Alinejad: ‘Every week they try to smear me, discredit me’ (Guardian)

Barbara Walters recovering, home soon (Politico)

Rachel Nichols Joins CNN and Turner Sports (CNN)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list 7/1/2012

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Sexual assault

A female journalist wrote of being sexually assaulted in Egypt’s Tahrir Square in a blog post this week. Natasha Smith, a British journalist and student, reported that she had been assaulted by a mob during celebrations marking the announcement of the results of Egypt’s presidential election. Her post quickly garnered attention across the web, and many drew parallels to a very similar attack on CBS correspondent Lara Logan more than a year ago. Read Smith’s post along with related reports below:

“Please God. Please make it stop.” (by Natasha Smith)

Another journalist reports sex assault in Tahrir Square (Committee to Project Journalists)

UK journalist assaulted in Tahrir Square: ‘Please make it stop’ (CNN)

Egypt’s Sexual Harassment Epidemic (Daily Beast)

Where are the women?

Newsweek/Daily Beast released a “Digital Power Index” this week in which women were only seven out of 100 honorees. Just the week before Foreign Policy offered up a Twitterati 100 list that was nearly 90 percent male (sparking the compilation of FPwomerati – 100 women to follow included in last week’s reading list). Here are some of the responses to the lack of women on these “top” lists:

Invisible Woman: Who’s missing from this list? All the digital ladies! It’s time to look where we’re not looking. (by Rachel Sklar)

How To Stop “Power” Lists From Angering Women and Making Men Defensive (Slate’s Future Tense)

New Media’s Old Problem (New York Times’ On the Ground)

General interest links

Studies show Olympics commentary differs based on gender, race and nationality (UDaily)

-Study: Girls More Plugged in Than Boys (XX Factor)

Tech Leaders Partner With Girls Who Code to Boost Industry’s Female Presence (Mashable)

Nora Ephron Dead: Remembering Her Journalism Career (Huffington Post)

Ann Curry Says Emotional Goodbye to ‘Today’: ‘This Is Not as I Expected to Ever Leave This Couch’ (TV Newser)

Savannah Guthrie Named Co-Host of ‘Today’ (Exclusive) (The Hollywood Reporter)

TechCrunch’s Alexia Tsotsis: ‘I like the emotional part of the news’ (Poynter)

Q&A with Shirley Carswell, deputy managing editor at the Washington Post (International Women’s Media Foundation)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

CDC releases study on rape and domestic violence

A national study released this week revealed the prevalence of rape, sexual assault and domestic violence in the United States as well as the effects and health consequences of these experiences.

The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey was done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and was supported by the National Institute of Justice and the Department of Defense. The study itself involved a telephone survey in 2010 of more than 16,500 adults. The report is thought to help guide and target prevention efforts.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the findings of a survey on rape and domestic violence this week. Click the image to view the report or executive summary.

Some of the report’s key numbers related to U.S. adults included:

  • Overall, more than one in three women and one in four men reported having experienced rape, physical violence or stalking by an intimate partner at some point in their lives.
  • One in five women and one in 71 men said they had been raped or experienced an attempted rape during their lifetime. More than half of female victims reported being raped by an intimate partner and another nearly 41 percent by an acquaintance. More than half of male victims also reported being raped by an acquaintance.
  • One in six women and one in 19 men have been stalked at some point in their lives.
  • One in four women and one in seven men reported having experienced “severe physical violence” by an intimate partner.

Additionally, findings focused on the impact of intimate partner violence, a look at these issues by race and ethnicity, violence in the last 12 months and health consequences for victims.

Many news outlets and online news sites picked up on the release of the survey results and reported on the findings. Stories focused on different aspects of the survey’s results. Stories also tended to either point out how “shocking,” “surprising” or “disturbing” these findings were or, in contrast, to point out that the study’s findings were not news. Those who stated the latter usually did credit the survey for confirming the prevalence of these issues and discrediting myths surrounding these topics, such as the idea that most rapes are perpetrated by strangers. These differences in emphasis and interpretation are most clearly demonstrated in the titles of the articles below:

Read an executive summary of the survey or the full report here.

This is the Gender Report’s Week in Review, a weekly post that highlights some of the major stories related to gender issues this week. Some of these stories may have already appeared in our News Feed or in the week’s Gender Checks. We’ll at times include a longer analysis of stories as well as bring attention to stories that may have slipped through the cracks of the week’s news cycle.

Week in Review: Women journalists in the news

This week was chock-full of stories about women in journalism. Here are a few of the highlights and links for where you can find more.

Treatment of female journalists abroad

Photojournalist Lynsey Addario, who was working on assignment for the New York Times, was strip searched and “humiliated” by soldiers during a security check when she entered Israel from the Gaza Strip, according to an article by the Associated Press. Due to her pregnancy, Addario requested not to have to go through the X-ray machine out of concern for her child. She instead was forced to go through the machine three times while soldiers watched and laughed. She then was strip searched by a female officer. An apology came Monday for the incident from Israel’s Defense Ministry.

After being released, journalist Mona Eltahawy posted this photo to Twitter showing the casts she needed as a result of injuries sustained during her detainment by security forces in Egypt. Eltahawy says she was beaten and sexually assaulted.

In addition, as we reported on last week, the risks for women reporters in Egypt are gaining media attention again after two female foreign journalists were sexually assaulted. The issue continued in the news this week as the women shared their stories.

Caroline Sinz, a broadcast journalist from France, was assaulted while covering protests. Additionally. Egyptian-American blogger and journalist Mona Eltahawy was beaten and sexually assaulted by local Egyptian security forces. A number of articles told of the pervasiveness of sexual assault, not just for journalists, and told these women’s stories. Here are a few:

Many reports made mention of “60 Minutes” reporter Lara Logan, who was sexually assaulted in Tahrir Square in February (Read our post on that attack here). The Women’s Media Center posted a video interview with Logan by founding president Carol Jenkins discussing her experience this week. Logan received the center’s Whole Truth Award, which was one of several given out at the Women’s Media Awards this week (Update: Read the WMC’s write up on the awards here).

Women who lead

The American Journalism Review this week looked at the question of whether women lead newsrooms differently. The article was specifically a response to the following comment by Jill Abramson, who (as we’ve previously written about) recently became the first woman to serve as the New York Times’ executive editor: “The idea that women journalists bring a different taste in stories or sensibility isn’t true” (as stated in a Sept. 10 New York Times column). The AJR article found that many top female managers and researchers disagree with her statement.

In addition, a new study in New Zealand by Dr. Catherine Strong looked at reasons behind the lack of women in journalism management and why women leave journalism. Strong attributed this issue to a “glass bubble” instead of the “glass ceiling.” Read more about the study here.

Other articles of note

A number of other noteworthy articles on topics related to women and media, including women journalists, popped up lately. Here are a few to add to your reading list if you haven’t already:

This is the Gender Report’s Week in Review, a weekly post that highlights some of the major stories related to gender issues this week. Some of these stories may have already appeared in our News Feed or in the week’s Gender Checks. We’ll at times include a longer analysis of stories as well as bring attention to stories that may have slipped through the cracks of the week’s news cycle.