Women in journalism: Reading list for 7/7/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Men, for the most part, still run newsrooms (Pew Researcher Center Fact Tank)

Journalism safety: INSI to offer training to female reporters in Egypt (Journalism.co.uk)

Female Foreign Journalist Gang-Raped in Horrific Tahrir Square Attack (Jezebel)

Egypt’s Plague of Sex Attacks (The Daily Beast)

Media boys’ club can’t afford to ignore women (The Globe and Mail)

UN Women Partners with Geena Davis on First-ever Global Gender in Film Research Study (UN Women press release)

Three Women Serve on the Supreme Court, and the New York Times Is on It (XX Factor)

Let’s get visual? On Pink tennis shoes. Pink stilettos. Purse boys. Pantsuit aficionados. (by Lindsey Meeks)

Woman’s work: The twisted reality of an Italian freelancer in Syria (Columbia Journalism Review)

Q&A: Liberian Journo, Melissa Chea-Annan (ReportHers)

Monday Q&A: Denise Malan on the new data-driven collaboration between INN and IRE (Nieman Journalism Lab)

Fox News’ Greta Van Susteren is staying, but Megyn Kelly moving to prime time (Poynter)

Amy Chozick to cover the Clintons for New York Times (JimRomenesko.com)

Soledad O’Brien Joins Al Jazeera America (The Wrap)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

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Women in journalism: Reading list 7/1/2012

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Sexual assault

A female journalist wrote of being sexually assaulted in Egypt’s Tahrir Square in a blog post this week. Natasha Smith, a British journalist and student, reported that she had been assaulted by a mob during celebrations marking the announcement of the results of Egypt’s presidential election. Her post quickly garnered attention across the web, and many drew parallels to a very similar attack on CBS correspondent Lara Logan more than a year ago. Read Smith’s post along with related reports below:

“Please God. Please make it stop.” (by Natasha Smith)

Another journalist reports sex assault in Tahrir Square (Committee to Project Journalists)

UK journalist assaulted in Tahrir Square: ‘Please make it stop’ (CNN)

Egypt’s Sexual Harassment Epidemic (Daily Beast)

Where are the women?

Newsweek/Daily Beast released a “Digital Power Index” this week in which women were only seven out of 100 honorees. Just the week before Foreign Policy offered up a Twitterati 100 list that was nearly 90 percent male (sparking the compilation of FPwomerati – 100 women to follow included in last week’s reading list). Here are some of the responses to the lack of women on these “top” lists:

Invisible Woman: Who’s missing from this list? All the digital ladies! It’s time to look where we’re not looking. (by Rachel Sklar)

How To Stop “Power” Lists From Angering Women and Making Men Defensive (Slate’s Future Tense)

New Media’s Old Problem (New York Times’ On the Ground)

General interest links

Studies show Olympics commentary differs based on gender, race and nationality (UDaily)

-Study: Girls More Plugged in Than Boys (XX Factor)

Tech Leaders Partner With Girls Who Code to Boost Industry’s Female Presence (Mashable)

Nora Ephron Dead: Remembering Her Journalism Career (Huffington Post)

Ann Curry Says Emotional Goodbye to ‘Today’: ‘This Is Not as I Expected to Ever Leave This Couch’ (TV Newser)

Savannah Guthrie Named Co-Host of ‘Today’ (Exclusive) (The Hollywood Reporter)

TechCrunch’s Alexia Tsotsis: ‘I like the emotional part of the news’ (Poynter)

Q&A with Shirley Carswell, deputy managing editor at the Washington Post (International Women’s Media Foundation)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list 4/29/12

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

The Digital (Gender) Divide: Women Are More Likely Than Men to Have a Blog (and a Facebook Profile) (The Atlantic)

Sri Lanka’s Top Media Jobs Still Elude Women  (Asia Sentinel)

Two Egyptian journalists attacked in Alexandria (Committee to Protect Journalists)

Journalist and human rights activist Dina Meza threatened again (Reporters Without Borders)

Liberian journalist Mae Azango on cold threats, hot stories (Committee to Protect Journalists)

Journalism professor awarded for diversity work (Baylor Lariat)

U. of Maryland j-school dean finalists make presentations (JimRomenesko.com)

Debra Leithauser leaves Washington Post for McClatchy (Poynter)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Week in Review: Women journalists in the news

This week was chock-full of stories about women in journalism. Here are a few of the highlights and links for where you can find more.

Treatment of female journalists abroad

Photojournalist Lynsey Addario, who was working on assignment for the New York Times, was strip searched and “humiliated” by soldiers during a security check when she entered Israel from the Gaza Strip, according to an article by the Associated Press. Due to her pregnancy, Addario requested not to have to go through the X-ray machine out of concern for her child. She instead was forced to go through the machine three times while soldiers watched and laughed. She then was strip searched by a female officer. An apology came Monday for the incident from Israel’s Defense Ministry.

After being released, journalist Mona Eltahawy posted this photo to Twitter showing the casts she needed as a result of injuries sustained during her detainment by security forces in Egypt. Eltahawy says she was beaten and sexually assaulted.

In addition, as we reported on last week, the risks for women reporters in Egypt are gaining media attention again after two female foreign journalists were sexually assaulted. The issue continued in the news this week as the women shared their stories.

Caroline Sinz, a broadcast journalist from France, was assaulted while covering protests. Additionally. Egyptian-American blogger and journalist Mona Eltahawy was beaten and sexually assaulted by local Egyptian security forces. A number of articles told of the pervasiveness of sexual assault, not just for journalists, and told these women’s stories. Here are a few:

Many reports made mention of “60 Minutes” reporter Lara Logan, who was sexually assaulted in Tahrir Square in February (Read our post on that attack here). The Women’s Media Center posted a video interview with Logan by founding president Carol Jenkins discussing her experience this week. Logan received the center’s Whole Truth Award, which was one of several given out at the Women’s Media Awards this week (Update: Read the WMC’s write up on the awards here).

Women who lead

The American Journalism Review this week looked at the question of whether women lead newsrooms differently. The article was specifically a response to the following comment by Jill Abramson, who (as we’ve previously written about) recently became the first woman to serve as the New York Times’ executive editor: “The idea that women journalists bring a different taste in stories or sensibility isn’t true” (as stated in a Sept. 10 New York Times column). The AJR article found that many top female managers and researchers disagree with her statement.

In addition, a new study in New Zealand by Dr. Catherine Strong looked at reasons behind the lack of women in journalism management and why women leave journalism. Strong attributed this issue to a “glass bubble” instead of the “glass ceiling.” Read more about the study here.

Other articles of note

A number of other noteworthy articles on topics related to women and media, including women journalists, popped up lately. Here are a few to add to your reading list if you haven’t already:

This is the Gender Report’s Week in Review, a weekly post that highlights some of the major stories related to gender issues this week. Some of these stories may have already appeared in our News Feed or in the week’s Gender Checks. We’ll at times include a longer analysis of stories as well as bring attention to stories that may have slipped through the cracks of the week’s news cycle.

Week in Review: A look at the Middle East

Photo credited to BBC Persian, from the New York Times. Participants marched against the widespread public sexual harassment of women on the streets of Kabul, Afghanistan, last July.

As political and social change continues to sweep through Egypt, Libya, Yemen and several other parts of the Middle East and Africa, the Gender Report looked at the key role women are playing in these processes. We’ve written before about protests, participation in marches, and pushes for representative government in these areas. Here are a few updates in these cases we found in our News Feed, as well as their representation in the media:

  • Libya: Women continue to speak out against rapes committed during the country’s long civil war, asking the new government to provide financial, legal and counseling support to victims. Read more via the Associated Press (as syndicated by the Washington Post).
  • Afghanistan: Nicholas Kristof, an avid supporter of women’s rights, featured a guest post by Noorjahan Akbar on his New York Times blog on her experiences with women marching for awareness of sexual harassment concerns. The post also highlighted organizations and women that are continuing this fight.
  • Egypt: The safety of female journalists in Tahrir Square continues to make headlines as another women, this time a female broadcast journalist from France, was assaulted while covering the protests. The organization Reporters Sans Frontieres, recanted a recommendation to remove female journalists from Tahrir Square for their own safety, after many journalists criticized the statement. One opinion piece for the Guardian said “If women journalists are told it’s too dangerous for them to go there, those voices are likely to be silenced altogether.” The Gender Report earlier highlighted the sexual assault of a “60 Minutes” reporter in February.

Have you seen or read other coverage of women in the Middle East? Post a comment or tweet it to the Gender Report or our News Feed, @GRNewsFeed or @GenderReport.