Women in journalism: Reading list for 11/17/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Women broadcasters send ‘life saving information’ through emergency radio Philippines (Women News Network)

Where are the stories in global media reported by Afghan women? (John S. Knight Journalism Fellowships at Stanford)

Data from the U.K.: The gender imbalance in newspapers is real, and both vertical and horizontal (Nieman Journalism Lab)

Logan Wore High Heels on Halloween, and Other Useless Anecdotes in the WAPost’s 60 Minutes Scandal Report (XX Factor)

New mag to cover global women’s issues (Columbia Journalism Review) On Valerie

One year in: Building an online women’s section ‘from scratch’ at the Telegraph (Journalism.co.uk)

Women In Sports: Fight the Power Outage (The Hairpin)

Janet Hinostroza, Ecuador: 2013 CPJ International Press Freedom Awardee (Committee to Protect Journalists)

Amy Robach’s onscreen test leads to breast cancer diagnosis (Poynter)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

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INSI launches book on female journalists’ experiences in conflict zones

The International News Safety Institute's "No Woman’s Land: On the Frontlines with Female Reporters" is available at http://www.newssafety.org.

The International News Safety Institute launched a publication titled “No Woman’s Land: On the Frontlines with Female Reporters” in time for International Women’s Day.

The book, sparked by the sexual assault of Lara Logan last year in Tahrir Square, includes a collection of 40 stories of the experiences of women journalists. INSI calls this effort the first book “solely dedicated to the safety of women journalists.”

In addition to Logan, contributors include several BBC correspondents such as Lyse Doucet, Caroline Wyatt and Frances Harrison, as well as Fox News’ Jennifer Griffin, al-Jazeera’s Zeina Awad, Somali investigative journalist Fatuma Noor, and countless others.

A panel discussion held for the book’s launch, chaired by Doucet, was live streamed online through Reuters. Check out Twitter comments via the hashtag #nowomansland and in the stream here.

Proceeds of the project go toward the group’s safety training for women journalists.

Here are a few write-ups on the project including excerpts and pieces by some of the books’ contributors.

Safety of women journalists on the frontline highlighted in new book (The Guardian)

Women journalists share stories from the frontline (Journalism.co.uk)

Women reporters on the front line: Tales of survival (BBC)

Women reporters on the front line: 15 survival tips (BBC)

On International Women’s Day, reflections from women journalists in war zones (Washington Post)

“No Woman’s Land” book details newswomen in warzones (Reuters)

Zeina Awad: On the front lines with female journalists  (Al Jazeera)

Frances Harrison: My double life as mother and foreign correspondent (Journalism.co.uk)

Women in journalism: Reading list 2/26/12

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

In Memory: Marie Colvin

Award-winning foreign correspondent Marie Colvin died in Syria this week alongside photojournalist Remi Ochlik. Colvin was remembered in numerous tributes across the web. Here are just a few:

The Risks of Bearing Witness: Discussing Marie Colvin’s Legacy (New York Magazine)

Opinion: Colvin fought injustice, armed only with words and images (Op-ed by Hannah Storm on CNN)

Marie Colvin: The death of a role model (by Helena Williams for the Press Gazette)

Profile: Marie Colvin, intrepid and fearless war correspondent (Reuters)

Journalists Marie Colvin and Remi Ochlik killed in Syria: Their last work and words (Washington Post)

Marie Colvin killed in Homs: tributes to Sunday Times journalist (Telegraph) – A round-up of statement about her death

Great Female Journalists (Independent) – A gallery of nine women starting with Colvin

General interest links

FishbowlDC’s Rothstein criticized for accusing female journalists of going for ‘the sexpot look’ (Poynter) – Includes a round-up of other articles related to the incident

More Discussion but Few Changes on Sexual Violence (by Lauren Wolfe as part of the Committee to Project Journalists’ Attacks on the Press in 2011)

Boys’ Clubhouse: Why Women Should Write About Sports (GOOD)

How many times has Elizabeth Warren been called darling? (Name It Change It)

On #dailywife and writing for the “women’s pages” (by Rachel Hills)

How To Be a Feminist in the Sports Culture Boys’ Club (If You Want To) (Women, Action & the Media)

Telling Stories in Contemporary Spain: A Survey of Women Writing Literary Journalism (World Literature Today)

Has confessional journalism gone too far? Yvonne Roberts and Lucy Cavendish discuss (The Guardian)

Coming clean on sex pests in the newsroom (The Australian)

How ‘Grammar Girl’ turned a single hobby podcast into a growing media network (Nieman Lab)

Margaret Low Smith to head NPR News (Poynter)

Melissa Harris-Perry of MSNBC gives new face to cable news (by Anna Holmes on the Washington Post)

‘Trailblazer’ Belva Davis to Retire From KQED After Presidential Election (TVSpy)

Interview: Louise Court, editor of Cosmopolitan, on how sex sells (The Guardian)

Safe at home: A feature on Lara Logan (New York Times Style Magazine)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport@gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter. 

Women in journalism: Reading list 2/13/12

The Gender Report is now providing a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week.

-REPORT: By A Nearly 2 To 1 Margin, Cable Networks Call On Men Over Women To Comment On Birth Control (Think Progress)

-Four Tips for Male Journalists Who Want to Discuss Women’s Health (Alyssa Rosenberg at Think Progress)

-Sunday Shows Overwhelmingly White And Male: Study (Huffington Post – Media)

-A Painterly World Press Photo Winner: “We seldom see veiled women in this way, at such an intimate moment.” (Lens – New York Times photo blog)

-BBC ‘got it wrong on women’ (The Guardian)

-The grammar of assault: Salisbury paper learns why ‘performing a sex act’ misrepresents the crime (Poynter)

-Cal Thomas Apologizes To Rachel Maddow For Contraception Comment (Huffington Post – Media)

-In the New York Times, Sheryl Sandberg Is Lucky, Men Are Good (Rebecca Rosen for The Atlantic)

-Finding ‘Life, Death And Hope’ In A Mumbai Slum: Interview with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Katherine Boo (NPR’s Fresh Air)

-When did The New York Times first get…[a woman reporter with a desk in the newsroom]? (Poynter)

-What it’s like to cover ‘unbearable’ stories of rape in Congo (by Lynsey Addario for Women Under Siege, a project to document sexualized violence in conflict. The project’s website launched this week.)

-From darkness, dignity: Why sexualized violence must move from the shadows (by Lara Logan for Women Under Siege)

-$20K grants available for female-driven digital journalism start-ups (10,000 Words)

-Help PhD research into women in journalism (Journalism.co.uk)

Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport@gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Week in Review: Women journalists in the news

This week was chock-full of stories about women in journalism. Here are a few of the highlights and links for where you can find more.

Treatment of female journalists abroad

Photojournalist Lynsey Addario, who was working on assignment for the New York Times, was strip searched and “humiliated” by soldiers during a security check when she entered Israel from the Gaza Strip, according to an article by the Associated Press. Due to her pregnancy, Addario requested not to have to go through the X-ray machine out of concern for her child. She instead was forced to go through the machine three times while soldiers watched and laughed. She then was strip searched by a female officer. An apology came Monday for the incident from Israel’s Defense Ministry.

After being released, journalist Mona Eltahawy posted this photo to Twitter showing the casts she needed as a result of injuries sustained during her detainment by security forces in Egypt. Eltahawy says she was beaten and sexually assaulted.

In addition, as we reported on last week, the risks for women reporters in Egypt are gaining media attention again after two female foreign journalists were sexually assaulted. The issue continued in the news this week as the women shared their stories.

Caroline Sinz, a broadcast journalist from France, was assaulted while covering protests. Additionally. Egyptian-American blogger and journalist Mona Eltahawy was beaten and sexually assaulted by local Egyptian security forces. A number of articles told of the pervasiveness of sexual assault, not just for journalists, and told these women’s stories. Here are a few:

Many reports made mention of “60 Minutes” reporter Lara Logan, who was sexually assaulted in Tahrir Square in February (Read our post on that attack here). The Women’s Media Center posted a video interview with Logan by founding president Carol Jenkins discussing her experience this week. Logan received the center’s Whole Truth Award, which was one of several given out at the Women’s Media Awards this week (Update: Read the WMC’s write up on the awards here).

Women who lead

The American Journalism Review this week looked at the question of whether women lead newsrooms differently. The article was specifically a response to the following comment by Jill Abramson, who (as we’ve previously written about) recently became the first woman to serve as the New York Times’ executive editor: “The idea that women journalists bring a different taste in stories or sensibility isn’t true” (as stated in a Sept. 10 New York Times column). The AJR article found that many top female managers and researchers disagree with her statement.

In addition, a new study in New Zealand by Dr. Catherine Strong looked at reasons behind the lack of women in journalism management and why women leave journalism. Strong attributed this issue to a “glass bubble” instead of the “glass ceiling.” Read more about the study here.

Other articles of note

A number of other noteworthy articles on topics related to women and media, including women journalists, popped up lately. Here are a few to add to your reading list if you haven’t already:

This is the Gender Report’s Week in Review, a weekly post that highlights some of the major stories related to gender issues this week. Some of these stories may have already appeared in our News Feed or in the week’s Gender Checks. We’ll at times include a longer analysis of stories as well as bring attention to stories that may have slipped through the cracks of the week’s news cycle.