Women in journalism: Reading list for 2/2/2014

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Online Feminism

An article in The Nation related to online feminism sparked a lot of discussion this week. Here is a link to the original piece as well as some of the responses. For additional responses, be sure to check out the hashtags #IStandWithKarnythia & #femfuture on Twitter.

Feminism’s Toxic Twitter Wars (The Nation)

Interlopers on Social Media: Feminism, Women of Color and Oppression (Prison Culture)

Why The Problem Of Online Toxicity Is Not The Same Thing As White Feminists vs. Non-White Feminists (HuffPost Women)

Is “Toxic” Online Culture Paralyzing Feminism? (XX Factor)

General Reading List

REPORT: Gender Diversity On The 2013 Sunday Morning Political Talk Shows (Media Matters for America)

Women Are the Dominant Media Voice During the Super Bowl: Ignore our tweets at your own peril (AdWeek)

Gender Inertia in Hollywood (Women’s Media Center)

Meet Foreign Policy Interrupted (Council on Foreign Policy)

Female Journalists: “Leave My Body Out Of It” (The Op-Ed Project’s Byline Blog)

Painting Wendy Davis as a bad mother is political sexism at its worst (The Guardian)

An Epic Feminist Edit-a-Thon Takes Aim at Wikipedia’s Gender Gap (Bitch Media)

13-Year-Old Blogger: I Promise Girls Will Change the World (Mashable)

A Pioneer of Street Photography Leaves Behind Strong Images of Indian Women (New York Times)

She Was Harassed By A Games Reporter. Now She’s Speaking Out. (Kotaku)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list for 8/25/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Why there’s no female Nate Silver (Salon)

Men, women, and media empire-building (by Ann Friedman)

The women’s pages: The upsides and downsides of starting your career in gender-specific digital media (Columbia Journalism Review) Also by Ann Friedman

Police say female photographer, 23, gang-raped in Mumbai (CNN)

The IWMF Launches Global Survey On Dangers For Women In News (International Women’s Media Foundation)

Editor Tries to Mansplain Gender Disparity, Fails Miserably (The Atlantic Wire)

Marissa Mayer and Sheryl Sandberg aren’t the only fierce women in tech (Venture Beat)

Can These Students Fix Wikipedia’s Lady Problem? (Mother Jones)

Women Contributors Still Face Hurdles at Wikipedia (WSJ)

How two young journalists are highlighting longform journalism written by women (Poynter)

Young female journalists: here’s your opportunity to shine (The Telegraph)

The 100 Best Websites For Women, 2013 (Forbes)

Q&A: Aerogram Founder, Lakshmi Gandhi (ReportHers)

A Q&A With Jill Abramson: The Times’ top editor on mean bosses, liberal biases, and the demise of the Washington Post (New Republic)

Lauren Ashburn Joins Fox News (Huffington Post)

Why is Chrystia Freeland leaving journalism to run for office? (Washington Post)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list 8/12/2012

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

We Never Said “We Wanted it All”: How the Media Distorts the Goals of Feminism (AlterNet)

‘Oxford American’ Editor Fired Following Harassment Accusation (New York Times)

Women On The Rise Among The World’s Top-Earning Authors (Forbes)

Media spotlight takes its toll on Gabby Douglas, Lolo Jones (Poynter)

Lolo Jones Article Is Too Harsh (NY Times Public Editor)

U-T San Diego ad called ‘sexist and silly’ (JimRomenesko.com)

Only 9% of Wikipedia Editors Are Women [INFOGRAPHIC] (Mashable)

Teens push for female debate moderator as female journalists quietly root for their success (Poynter)

Carole Simpson wants a female moderator (Politico)

Women’s Magazines Lead Overall Decline in Newsstand Sales (NY Times Media Decoder)

Newsweek Cover is Definitely About Food (FAIR Blog)

A Critical Voice Lost to Ethiopia’s War on Information (International Women’s Media Foundation) On journalist Reeyot Alemu

Remembering Judith Crist (Columbia Journalism Review)

Grand Forks Herald columnist Marilyn Hagerty wins Al Neuharth Award (JimRomenesko.com)

How This Woman Became ‘Digital Royalty’ (Mashable) On Amy Jo Martin

Editorial Page Promotion at The Times (The New York Times) Terry Tang named deputy editorial page editor

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Week in Review: Jan. 31 – Feb. 4

*Week in Review is a weekly post that highlights some of the major stories related to gender issues this week. Some of these stories may have already appeared in our News Feed or in the week’s Gender Checks. We’ll at times include a longer analysis of stories as well as bring attention to stories that may have slipped through the cracks of the week’s news cycle.

Healthcare legislation

This week the GOP moved forward with its plan to dismantle Obama’s healthcare plan by focusing on portions of the legislation dealing with federal funds for abortions. On Monday H.R.3, named  the “No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act,” introduced language that would redefine the terms under which a woman could receive federal funds for an abortion after rape or incest. The proposed change aimed to limit funding to pregnancies resulting from “forcible” rape. After criticism from several groups, a spokesman for Rep. Chris Smith (R-N.J.), one of the bill’s authors, said the word “forcible” would be dropped. He told the Washington Post Thursday that lawmakers decided to change the term because it was being “misconstrued.” The bill will now revert back to the language already in place through the Hyde Amendment.

The Hyde Amendment*, originally passed in 1976, governs the current uses and restrictions of federal funds used for abortions. Federal funds cannot be used except in cases of rape, incest, or when a mother’s life is in danger. It also bans abortion funding for women on Medicaid, women in the military or Peace Corps, and those who receive medical care from Indian Health Services. The bill proposed by Smith and other sponsors will make the restrictions set in place by the Hyde Amendment a permanent appropriations law. Currently it has to be recodfied in appropriations each year.

Planned Parenthood also took the spotlight later in this week’s news cycle after undercover videos showed employees giving medical advice to men posing as pimps of child prostitutes. One worker was fired as a result of the tapes. Some members of Congress are using the videos as momentum to remove all federal funding from the organization under H.R.614Live Action, the group responsible for the videos, claims staff turned a blind eye to sexual trafficking and exploitation of minors.

Thursday, 27 groups sent a letter to Congress in support of Planned Parenthood, including the NAACP and Sierra Club. “Right-wing groups are once again attempting to destroy an organization dedicated to providing crucial primary care services to Americans that need them most. Armed with heavily edited videos, countless lies, and a shameless echo chamber that repeats unfounded accusations ad nauseam, they’ve now turned their sights to Planned Parenthood, which offers a range of important health and reproductive services,” the letter reads (as taken from POLITICO excerpt).

According to its website, over 3 million men and women received health-related services from Planned Parenthood’s 820 health centers last year, including 1 million Pap tests and 4 million tests and treatment for STDs. Three percent of all Planned Parenthood health services are abortion services. Currently the organization does not receive federal money for any of its abortion services.

In Other News

A study released this week showed that after 10 years, Wikipedia’s contributor base consisted of less than 15 percent female authors.  The disparity also shows up in the emphasis of posts by male vs. female authors. Sue Gardner, the executive director of the foundation, has set a goal to raise the share of female contributors to 25 percent by 2015 (as reported in the New York Times).

*The link to the full text of the Hyde Amendment was taken from the National Right to Life website. The site provided the most easily accessible link to the original legislation, but is not in any way an endorsement of this group or its stance on this issue. Whenever possible the Gender Report tries to link to original sources and primary documents or otherwise fully cites any reprinted quotes or information.