Women in journalism: Reading list for 3/16/2014

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Violence and Harassment against Women in the News Media: A Global Picture (IWMF) A new report

Women journalists harassed and abused, often by colleagues – survey (Thomson Reuters Foundation)

Journalism startups aren’t a revolution if they’re filled with all these white men (Guardian)

The Online Journalism “Revolution” Will Produce More Powerful White Men (XX Factor)

Only 15 Percent of Top Films in 2013 Put Women in Lead Roles, Study Finds (New York Times)

Here’s What Two Generations of Women Journos Have to Say about Sexism at Work (Newsflash: It Still Exists!) (Girl w/ Pen)

Who Creates Drama At HBO? Very Few Women Or People Of Color (Huffington Post)

Sexism in sport: Why do internet trolls target women? (CNN)

No increase in women’s sport coverage since the 2012 Olympics (Guardian)

Move Over Glossy Magazines. Now Social Media Makes Young Girls Hate Themselves. (XX Factor)

Q&A: NYT Correspondent Tanzina Vega (ReportHers)

Melissa Harris-Perry on sexism, parenting and work: “We reproduce this fantasy of perfected motherhood” (Salon)

A Conversation with Nepali Journalist, Women’s Rights Advocate Jaya Luintel (In Asia)

‘WSJ’ Editor Liz Heron Leaves for Job at Facebook (Mashable)

Vanessa Friedman is NYT’s new top fashion critic (Poynter)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

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Women in journalism: Reading list for 11/24/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Journalists can help curb gender-based violence (Committee to Protect Journalists)

Newsmagazine’s Handling of Sex Harassment Complaint Draws Criticism (New York Times)

Wonder Women Show Might at ‘Indie’ Hyperlocal Sites (Street Fight)

An Uptick in the Hiring of Women for Tech Jobs (Bits Blog)

Majority of Snapchat users are women, its CEO says (CNET)

Woman’s 35 years of TV news tapes bound for preservation (Poynter)

Google looks to empower women in India, launches ‘Help get women online’ initiative (DNA)

What It’s Like To Start A Digital Mag On Global Women’s Issues (10,000 Words)

Self-Confidence, Maternity Leave And Page 3: Top Female Journalists Discuss Issues Surrounding Women In Media (Huffington Post)

Liz Spayd named editor-in-chief of ‘CJR’ (Capital New York)

BuzzFeed creates unique media beat (CNN)

Buzzfeed to name Jina Moore international women’s rights correspondent (Capital New York)

Mills to chair Women in Journalism (The Guardian)

Katie Couric Deal to Become Yahoo’s “Global News Anchor” Set to Be Announced Monday (All Things D)

Q&A: Rookie Mag Editor, Anaheed Alani (ReportHers)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list 8/12/2012

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

We Never Said “We Wanted it All”: How the Media Distorts the Goals of Feminism (AlterNet)

‘Oxford American’ Editor Fired Following Harassment Accusation (New York Times)

Women On The Rise Among The World’s Top-Earning Authors (Forbes)

Media spotlight takes its toll on Gabby Douglas, Lolo Jones (Poynter)

Lolo Jones Article Is Too Harsh (NY Times Public Editor)

U-T San Diego ad called ‘sexist and silly’ (JimRomenesko.com)

Only 9% of Wikipedia Editors Are Women [INFOGRAPHIC] (Mashable)

Teens push for female debate moderator as female journalists quietly root for their success (Poynter)

Carole Simpson wants a female moderator (Politico)

Women’s Magazines Lead Overall Decline in Newsstand Sales (NY Times Media Decoder)

Newsweek Cover is Definitely About Food (FAIR Blog)

A Critical Voice Lost to Ethiopia’s War on Information (International Women’s Media Foundation) On journalist Reeyot Alemu

Remembering Judith Crist (Columbia Journalism Review)

Grand Forks Herald columnist Marilyn Hagerty wins Al Neuharth Award (JimRomenesko.com)

How This Woman Became ‘Digital Royalty’ (Mashable) On Amy Jo Martin

Editorial Page Promotion at The Times (The New York Times) Terry Tang named deputy editorial page editor

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

“Nonsense” or not, Cain allegations bring attention back to gender-based workplace struggles

It’s no surprise the allegations of sexual harassment against GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain are still grabbing headlines weeks after Politico first reported the National Restaurant Association settlements with two women.

But more surprising, or at least eye opening, has been the media discussion about sexual harassment as a legitimate offense. Politics have always been clouded by sex scandals, recently demonstrated by the likes of Anthony Weiner and John Edwards. In these cases, the misconduct was clearly inappropriate.

With sexual harassment, however, the lines between appropriate and uncomfortable can be seen as blurred. The Gender Report decided to take a deeper look at the definition of sexual harassment, and the different takes the media have had in regards to the Cain allegations.

History and statistics

Sexual harassment is defined by Title IX of the Civil Rights Act as “unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature…” when the conduct “explicitly or implicitly affects an individual’s employment, unreasonably interferes with an individual’s work performance, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.”

One Yale scholar described the inclusion of sexual harassment in this sort of legislation as “momentous.” Before this time, sexual harassment was not necessarily seen as a serious offense and often blamed on sensitivity or over-exaggeration on the part of the victim. Most companies now have explicit sexual harassment policies in place. The Civil Rights Act put sexual harassment on the same level as harassment or discrimination based on race, religion, or disability.

The most famous case of sexual harassment came in 1991 when Anita Hill claimed Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her during her time as his assistant. (The Christian Science Monitor, The Washington Post, and the Huffington Post were just a few media outlets to compare the Hill controversy to the current coverage of Herman Cain.)

In Fiscal Year 2008, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission received 13,867 charges of sexual harassment. 15.9 percent of those charges were filed by males. A November 16 ABC/Washington Post poll found 1 in 4 women reported harassment in their workplaces.

Cain and the media

As is the case for several claims of sexual harassment or violence, Cain has labeled the four women who accused him of harassment as anything from “troubled,gold-diggers, and outright lairs planning a coordinated effort to derail his bid for president. He also accused the media of “fundamentally unserious” journalism for reporting the allegations. A recent Fox News poll stated that over half of voters think politics or the possibility of financial gain are behind the claims.

Other voices in the debate are praising the women for coming forward, as well as trying to bring the focus back to the broader issue of continued discrimination, in the form of harassment, against women in the workplace. As one blogger for Forbes concludes:

“What’s news isn’t so much that sexual harassment still happens, but that in 20 years, we haven’t come any closer to fixing it and have actually been downgrading it as a serious workplace challenge.”

Here are some other news articles and well-written opinions about the topic: