Women in journalism: Reading list for 4/20/2014

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism, media and technology during the past week, as well as articles related to the intersections of gender, race, class, nationality, ability, and sexual orientation and the media. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Where Twitter and Feminism Meet (The Nation)

Attack on AP journalists in Afghanistan rekindles a daughter’s pain (Washington Post)

16 women whose digital startups deserve Vox-level plaudits (Columbia Journalism Review)

16 women whose digital startups deserve Vox-level plaudits – See more at: http://www.cjr.org/realtalk/women_digital_startups.php#sthash.Nbzqj8a8.dpuf

Light And Dark: The Racial Biases That Remain In Photography (NPR)

Home Is the First 3D Animated Film Starring A Black Character (Jezebel)

WGA: Women Screenwriters Losing Ground, Money to Male Counterparts (The Wrap)

Photojournalist Maggie Steber never gives up (Poynter)

New award named for AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus (Poynter)

Call for Proposals: Alexia Foundation 2014 Women’s Initiative Grant – See more at: http://mediastorm.com/blog/2014/04/04/call-for-proposals-alexia-foundation-2014-womens-initiative-grant/#sthash.fW8ULB29.dpufCall
Call for Proposals: Alexia Foundation 2014 Women’s Initiative Grant – See more at: http://mediastorm.com/blog/2014/04/04/call-for-proposals-alexia-foundation-2014-womens-initiative-grant/#sthash.fW8ULB29.dpuf
Call for Proposals: Alexia Foundation 2014 Women’s Initiative Grant – See more at: http://mediastorm.com/blog/2014/04/04/call-for-proposals-alexia-foundation-2014-womens-initiative-grant/#sthash.fW8ULB29.dpuf

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list for 6/16/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

A letter to the editors on Port magazine’s cover (JimRomenesko.com) Related: “Just a bunch of white male editors standing around

Are women writers pushing men out of their chairs at the high-toned navel-gazing table? (She the People)

Style guide aims to make it easier to cover stories like Plan B (Poynter)

Who Do Journos Listen To? (Women In the Media)

The Femisphere: Bloggers From Canada (Ms Blog)

Helen Brush Jenkins, early LA news photographer was 94 (LA Observed)

Erin Lee Carr Leaves Vice for The Verge (New York Observer)

BuzzFeed Names Miriam Elder Foreign and National Security Editor (Fishbowl NY)

CNN Rehires Kelly Wallace, Primarily as Digital Reporter (NY Times Media Decoder)

Wednesday Q&A: Susan Glasser on heading to Politico, the state of foreign reporting, and balancing blogs and longform (Nieman Journalism Lab)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

On Politico and the criticism of Jill Abramson

Politico ruffled some feathers this week when it published a piece on Jill Abramson, executive editor of The New York Times, that had many questioning whether the story would have been written if she was a man.

This piece published by Politico on Tuesday about New York Times' editor Jill Abramson set off a wave of criticism.
This piece published by Politico on Tuesday about New York Times’ editor Jill Abramson set off a wave of criticism.

The “Turbulence at The Times” story, written by Politico’s Dylan Byers and relying heavily on anonymous sources, argues that the Times’ first female executive editor is “on the verge of losing the support of the newsroom.” She is described throughout the piece as “brusque,” “condescending,” “uncaring,” and “blunt,” though “few doubt her wisdom or her experience.” According to the article, she has a “nasal car honk” voice and she travels a lot (often she’s required). And once she told an editor to change a home page photo in the middle of a meeting by stating, “I don’t know why you’re still here. If I were you, I would leave now and change the photo.”

Many took Politico to task via Twitter and other platforms regarding the perceived sexism of the piece. Twitter comments included those from writer Lisa McIntire who said, “I struggle to find any specific behavior of Abramson’s that is critiqued here other than the tone of her voice” and feminist author Jessica Valentia who said, “This breathtakingly sexist Politico article does all but accuse Jill Abramson of attracting bears with her period” (See there other Twitter comments here and here). Hanna Rosin, writing for Slate, argued that the piece is “pretty thin” and “possibly sexist.” Emily Bell in the Guardian wrote, “The lame nature of the reporting suggests it might be better just to ignore the piece entirely, but it deserves attention, as it fuels an exasperating and wholly sexist narrative about women in power.”

Some have pointed out that numerous Times’ (male) editors have been criticized over the years. Byers responded to some of the criticism (specifically Bell’s) and stated that he “spoke with more than a dozen staffers from across the newsroom, male and female, old and young. They all voiced similar complaints, and said that those complaints were deeply felt and widespread.”

However, the difference with this piece, as Jessica Bennett argues on Jezebel, is that it’s not a story about her competence, but instead is about her “likability” in a leadership position. Several authors pointed to research in Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s new book, Lean In, that talks about how for women success and likeability are negatively correlated. For women in leadership, this “double bind” plays out often, Sandberg writes on page 41 of her book, “When a woman excels at her job, both male and female coworkers will remark that she may be accomplishing a lot but is ‘not well-liked’ by her peers.”

Sandberg and others point to the Heidi/Howard case study which found that just changing the name (and, therefore, the sex) of the leader described altered people’s perceptions – he was more appealing and she was selfish and “not the type of person you would want to hire or work for” (Sandberg, p. 40). As a result, many questioned whether the same story would have been written or if Abramson would be perceived the same way if her name were “Joe” or “Jack” instead of “Jill.” (For an interesting piece comparing descriptions, see Ann Friedman’s “If Jill Abramson where a man…“).

Also in response to Politico’s piece, media critic Erik Wemple published an equally sourced piece arguing that Politico’s “men’s club” has its own gender issues to worry about.

As for Abramson herself, in an email sent to Rosin she responded by sharing her horoscope from the day of the article, “You will need to put on a brave face today, especially if you get news that seems to be the opposite of what you were hoping to hear. The important word there is “seems,” because most likely it IS good news after all.”

Here is a round-up of articles on Politico’s piece:

Politico: NYT Boss Lady Too Bossy (Women’s Media Center)

Jill Abramson: ‘Very Unpopular’ Or Just Doing Her Job? (Huffington Post)

Politico’s ‘turbulence’ story about New York Times’ Jill Abramson: All wind (Poynter)

More reactions to Politico’s ‘Turbulence at The Times’ story (Poynter)

Jill Abramson and the wholly sexist narrative of the woman in power (Guardian)

You Don’t Know Jill: Politico’s story about New York Times editor Jill Abramson is wrong and possibly sexist (Slate)

If Jill Abramson were a man… (by Ann Friedman)

What If Jill Abramson Were Joe? (Jezebel)

Reporting on industry gossip: How Politico should have reported the “turbulence” at The New York Times (Columbia Journalism Review)

Newsroom B*tches, An Appreciation (by Debra PIckett)

The double bind for Jill Abramson and other women at the top (Washington Post)

Can Politico spot gender issues? (by Erik Wemple at the Washington Post)

Women in journalism: Reading list 2/17/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

A good feting for The Feminine Mystique: But the media should be this evenhanded about feminism all the time (Columbia Journalism Review)

The Feminine Mystique, 50 Years Later (Room for Debate)

The media and violence against women: A conversation with Maria Hinojosa (Women Under Siege)

Female Journalists Walk on Eggshells in Sri Lanka (IPS)

Sudan: Female journalists trained on role of women in conflict resolution (AfriqueJet)

Placing blame: Report debunks misconceptions about wartime rape (Women Under Siege)

Changing the journalism radar: That’s Maria Burns Ortiz’s story (Voxxi)

UP to Bihar: Why a group of rural women journalists went online (Firstpost)

The Femisphere: Latina Bloggers (Ms. Blog)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list 2/10/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

The Digital Safety Gap and the Online Harassment of Women (HuffPost Media)

Haters Gonna Hate. What’s a Woman to Do About It? (New York Magazine)

Sexist Super Bowl ads? #NotBuyingIt, some say (CNN)

House Of Cards Thinks All Female Political Reporters Are Mean Sluts (Slate)

Shhhh…no one tell Fox News about the “wedding kiss”… (via Jessica Valenti)

How bloggers became the new “chick lit” heroines (Poynter)

Beliefnet tells writer: Don’t use the word ‘feminist’ on your blog (JimRomenesko.com)

Concern About Somalia Rape Case Verdict (State Department)

Margaret Sullivan makes Medill Magazine’s cover (JimRomenesko.com)

Robin Roberts to Return to ‘Good Morning America’ Feb. 20 (ABC News)

Jill Abramson on paywalls, Howell Raines and 9/11 (JimRomenesko.com) Related: “Alec Baldwin scolds his listeners for complaining about Jill Abramson’s voice. (@ABFalecbaldwin)”

RIP Annette Buchanan, reporter who protected her pot-smoking sources in the ’60s (JimRomenesko.com)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.