Women in journalism: Reading list 8/12/2012

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

We Never Said “We Wanted it All”: How the Media Distorts the Goals of Feminism (AlterNet)

‘Oxford American’ Editor Fired Following Harassment Accusation (New York Times)

Women On The Rise Among The World’s Top-Earning Authors (Forbes)

Media spotlight takes its toll on Gabby Douglas, Lolo Jones (Poynter)

Lolo Jones Article Is Too Harsh (NY Times Public Editor)

U-T San Diego ad called ‘sexist and silly’ (JimRomenesko.com)

Only 9% of Wikipedia Editors Are Women [INFOGRAPHIC] (Mashable)

Teens push for female debate moderator as female journalists quietly root for their success (Poynter)

Carole Simpson wants a female moderator (Politico)

Women’s Magazines Lead Overall Decline in Newsstand Sales (NY Times Media Decoder)

Newsweek Cover is Definitely About Food (FAIR Blog)

A Critical Voice Lost to Ethiopia’s War on Information (International Women’s Media Foundation) On journalist Reeyot Alemu

Remembering Judith Crist (Columbia Journalism Review)

Grand Forks Herald columnist Marilyn Hagerty wins Al Neuharth Award (JimRomenesko.com)

How This Woman Became ‘Digital Royalty’ (Mashable) On Amy Jo Martin

Editorial Page Promotion at The Times (The New York Times) Terry Tang named deputy editorial page editor

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

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Women in journalism: Reading list 3/18/12

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Zimbabwe’s Female Journalists Get U.S. Backing to Promote Equity in The Newsrooms (Voice of America)

Female journalists offer students insights (The National) – a panel discussion as part of the Women as Global Leaders conference hosted by Zayed University

#jpod – Gender and conflict journalism: How far have we come? (Journalism.co.uk)

Scripps Howard Awards announced (Poynter)

Her Rightful Place (Insider Higher Ed) – female philosophers and the New York Times’ obits

Reporting on conflict: ‘No-brainer that women are out there’ (Journalism.co.uk)

Are Book Publishers To Blame For Gender Discrimination? (Huffington Post)

Future of Feminism: No More Media Sexualization of Women (Ms. Blog)

Alice C. Steinbach, Pulitzer Prize winner, dies at 78 (Baltimore Sun)

In Liberia, reporting on genital mutilation draws threats (CPJ)

Liberia: IFJ Calls On Govt to Protect Threatened Female Journalist (AllAfrica)

Azerbaijan journalist ‘blackmailed’ with explicit video (The New Age)

Man arrested in connection to assault on journalist (INSI)

Marie Colvin: Mourners say farewell to ‘talented, compassionate’ war reporter (The Guardian)

Jill Abramson on the NYT as local vs. international paper: ‘We can have it all’ (Poynter)

‘WSJ’ hires away ‘New York Times’ social media editor Liz Heron (Capital New York)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Week in Review: 7 billion people and 7 stories about women

"As world welcomes '7 billionth baby,' UN says empowering women is key to stability" - Christian Science Monitor

According to United Nations estimates, the world population hit 7 billion this week. As a result, we’ve turned this week’s Week in Review post into a seven-story round-up of top news related to women and girls.

1. Seven billion and counting

With the world population hitting 7 billion, the UN argued that empowering women is vital to stabilizing growth, as demonstrated in this Christian Science Monitor piece. A baby girl named Danica Camacho born in the Philippines on Oct. 31 became the symbolic seven billionth baby.

2. Women’s rights in the Arab Spring

Continued concerns about the role of women and women’s rights during upheaval in the Middle East emerged this week. U.S. State Department officials spoke to a Senate committee about the issues Wednesday. Tunisian women demonstrated regarding their rights on the same day in light of the election victories of an Islamic party.

3. Herman Cain deals with sexual harassment accusations

Campaign coverage this week was dominated by allegations that presidential candidate Herman Cain was accused of sexual harassment during his time working for the National Restaurant Association in the late 1990s. Politico broke the story that at least two women had complained of “inappropriate behavior” from Cain. These women ultimately left their jobs with financial packages and having signed nondisclosure causes, meaning they are unable to discuss the issues. Cain has denied the claims and suggested it was the work of candidate Rick Perry’s campaign. A third woman came forward saying she considered filing a workplace complaint against Cain. One woman received permission to speak about the matter publicly and issued a statement through her lawyer.

4. Journalists and sexual violence

The Atlantic published a piece by Lauren Wolfe, director of Women Under Siege, about journalists and sexual violence, specifically the efforts of Jineth Bedoya Lima, a Colombian journalist to seek justice nearly a dozen years after she was drugged, kidnapped and gang raped. Women Under Siege is a new initiative by the Womens’ Media Center on sexualized violence in conflict situations.

5. Gender-based online harassment

Women writers also spoke out this week regarding the harassment they receive online for writing and expressing their opinions and called for it to stop. Women detailed comments ranging from their level of attractiveness to threats of gang rape and mutilation. One woman, Laurie Penny, referred to a woman’s opinion as the “mini-skirt of the Internet.”

6. Not Funny Facebook

In an effort to combat a specific issue of misogyny online, activists campaigned to put pressure on Facebook to enforce and clarify its guidelines and to remove pages that promote sexual violence. Facebook’s Terms of Service do ban “hateful, threatening” content and those that contained “graphic or gratuitous violence,” but Facebook has refused to remove these pages, saying they are jokes or don’t qualify as hate speech. Campaigns included a “Rape is Not Funny” campaign in the UK and a Change.org petition and social media campaign (See #notfunnyfacebook on Twitter) in the US. As of the time of this post, campaigners noted that at least one page — “You know she’s playing hard to get when your chasing her down an alleyway” — has been taken down this week.

7. Feminism and the web

For those looking for a good read, New York Magazine published a piece this week titled “The Rebirth of the Feminist Manifesto” about the ways the blogosphere has “transformed” the feminist conversation. It includes interviews with a number of feminist figures on the web and a roundup of some links to their sites.

This is the Gender Report’s Week in Review, a weekly post that highlights some of the major stories related to gender issues this week. Some of these stories may have already appeared in our News Feed or in the week’s Gender Checks. We’ll at times include a longer analysis of stories as well as bring attention to stories that may have slipped through the cracks of the week’s news cycle.