Women in journalism: Reading list for 3/9/2014

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

International Women’s Day: more than just a cover story (The Guardian)

Oscar Voters: 94% White, 76% Men, and an Average of 63 Years Old (The Atlantic)

Why Sister Act Is One of the Most Important Movies Ever Made (Representation Project)

Sisterhood of the plucky reporters: Our enduring obsession with the “intrepid female journalist” (Columbia Journalism Review)

Q&A: Ellen Miller on the Sunlight Foundation’s role in increasing the availability of open data (Nieman Lab)

How Foreign Affairs learned to love digital (Digiday) A conversation with Foreign Affairs publisher Lynda Hammes

Q&A: Filmmaker, Angeline Gragasin (ReportHers)

2.5 Minutes With Ann Friedman (The Riveter)

Times’ Julie Bosman leaves publishing beat for Midwest gig (Capital New York)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

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Women in journalism: Reading list for 8/25/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Why there’s no female Nate Silver (Salon)

Men, women, and media empire-building (by Ann Friedman)

The women’s pages: The upsides and downsides of starting your career in gender-specific digital media (Columbia Journalism Review) Also by Ann Friedman

Police say female photographer, 23, gang-raped in Mumbai (CNN)

The IWMF Launches Global Survey On Dangers For Women In News (International Women’s Media Foundation)

Editor Tries to Mansplain Gender Disparity, Fails Miserably (The Atlantic Wire)

Marissa Mayer and Sheryl Sandberg aren’t the only fierce women in tech (Venture Beat)

Can These Students Fix Wikipedia’s Lady Problem? (Mother Jones)

Women Contributors Still Face Hurdles at Wikipedia (WSJ)

How two young journalists are highlighting longform journalism written by women (Poynter)

Young female journalists: here’s your opportunity to shine (The Telegraph)

The 100 Best Websites For Women, 2013 (Forbes)

Q&A: Aerogram Founder, Lakshmi Gandhi (ReportHers)

A Q&A With Jill Abramson: The Times’ top editor on mean bosses, liberal biases, and the demise of the Washington Post (New Republic)

Lauren Ashburn Joins Fox News (Huffington Post)

Why is Chrystia Freeland leaving journalism to run for office? (Washington Post)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Count shows few women as National Magazine Award finalists

The announcement of the 2012 National Magazine Award finalists drew attention this week, not for the finalists themselves but for those who were missing.

Ann Friedman pointed out that no women were listed among finalists for the American Society of Magazine Editors’ awards in the reporting, feature writing, profile writing, essays and criticism, columns and commentary categories. However, women were the majority of candidates for the public interest, personal service and fiction categories, in other words, two those three categories are “servicey” (as Friedman noted) and most of the articles that were nominated are on “women’s issues,” such as body image (including an article on getting a “mommy tuck”), relationship or sexual violence, or specific women’s health issues like breast cancer.

This provoked a number of posts and commentary. Alyssa Rosenberg at Think Progress pointed out the fact that the awards include a women’s magazine category but no men’s magazine category, meaning men’s mags are included as general interest. References were also made to VIDA’s annual byline count, which has shown male authors dominating the space in top magazines. Said VIDA’s Erin Belieu in an interview with Mother Jones, “The National Magazine Awards have sent a pretty clear message… When it comes to a career in journalism, chicks should stick to writing about chicks.”

Meanwhile, Brooke Hatfield started an #ASSME hashtag on Twitter in an effort to point out quality work by women in 2011. Here are some examples:

All of this drew a response from Sid Holt, the chief executive of ASME, who explained the selection process and called the criticisms “kind of silly,” according to Poynter. He also identified women who have been in nominated in recent years. Rosenberg reported that Holt did acknowledge that the questioned women’s magazine category has been a “subject of debate” and explained the reasoning behind it.

Read commentaries on women and the awards as well as the judging process in the articles below:

What do you think of the lack of women finalists in major award categories? Are counts like this important? What do they mean? Share your thoughts in the comment section below.