Women in journalism: Reading list for 5/5/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

‘Forbidden Voices’: Female bloggers fight for freedom of speech (CNN)

’100 Percent Men’ Tumblr highlights gender gap in media, tech, politics (Poynter)

2013 National Magazine Awards widen scope, and women win (Poynter)

The International Women’s Media Foundation announces its 2013 Courage in Journalism and Lifetime Achievement Award winners (IWMF)

‘See you on the other side’: Meet Jessica Lum, a terminally ill 25-year-old who chose to spend what little time she had practicing journalism (Columbia Journalism Review)

WMC Announces A Celebration of the Life of Mary Thom (Women’s Media Center)

She Works: The Only Woman in the Room (NPR) On Nina Totenberg, NPR’s legal affairs correspondent

Hollywood’s utter failure to accurately portray female journalists (The Week)

Sarah Stierch Emerges as Wikipedia’s ‘Go-To Woman’ (Women’s eNews)

Carolyn Ryan is named New York Times political editor (JimRomenesko.com)

Jennifer Forsyth is named Wall Street Journal US editor (JimRomenesko.com)

The Pulitizer-Prize Winner As a Young Feminist (Ms. Blog) On Quiara Alegria Hudes

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

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Women in journalism: Reading list 4/7/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

National Magazine Award: Year of the Woman (Finally) (Mother Jones)

Awful New York Times Obit for Rocket Scientist Rhapsodizes About Her Beef Stroganoff (Jezebel)

To avoid sexism, follow AP style: The New York Times would have dodged a headache in its Yvonne Brill obituary (Columbia Journalism Review)

Imprisoned Ethiopian journalist Reeyot Alemu threatened with solitary confinement; denied urgently needed medical care (International Women’s Media Foundation)

Quotas get results: A chat with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes on tapping sources more diverse than the usual pool of white dudes (Columbia Journalism Review)

Race for the Prize: On Nellie Bly and Elizabeth Bisland (Los Angeles Review of Books)

9 Real-Life Lessons Learned From Chick-Flick Journalists (Refinery 29)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list 4/22/12

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

If It’s Sunday, It’s Meet The Republican White Men (Think Progress)

Happy 8th Birthday to Feministing! (Feministing)

‘Boys On The Bus’: 40 Years Later, Many Are Girls (NPR)

Where Are the Women Writers? ASME Chief Responds (Mother Jones)

What’s With Magazine Journalism and Women? (The Atlantic Wire)

IWMF Announces 2012 Winners of Women Entrepreneurs in Digital News Frontier Grants (IWMF)

Hillary’s Hair: More newsworthy than the Summit of the Americas? (WIMN’s Voices)

Study: Readers value extra editing, women especially (Poynter)

MaryAnne Golon named Washington Post’s new director of photography (Poynter)

PulseWire Member Naglaa Seed Ahmed Brutally Beaten by Sudanese Forces (World Pulse)

Lost in a life outside Syria (Women Under Siege) – About photojournalist Matilde Gattoni

A 1973 ‘gal’ sports reporter looks back at the era’s journalistic hurdles (Chicago Tribune)

Sara Ganim, 24, wins Pulitzer for coverage of Penn State sex abuse scandal (Poynter)

McGill medal winner shares stories of courage with students (Red and Black)

Joye Patterson remembered as innovator in the field of science journalism at MU  (Missourian)

Christiane Amanpour: ‘There’s still so much prejudice out there’ (The Guardian)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list 4/15/12

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

5 Guidelines that Can Prevent Sexist Reporting on Women in Politics (AlterNet)

BBC in new sexism row after gender pay gap revealed (The Telegraph)

How 25 National Magazine Award Nominations Went To 25 Male Writers (The Awl) – Read our round-up post on the controversy here.

Ashley Judd Slaps Media in the Face for Speculation Over Her ‘Puffy’ Appearance (Daily Beast)

Ashley Judd leads push back against image-based appraisals of women (Anna Holmes for the Washington Post)

Meet the most popular woman at NPR’s Fresh Air (and it’s not Terry Gross) (Nieman Lab)

Publisher receives top honor for women journalists in region (The Salem News)

Jessica Mendoza finds hope in Rwanda (espnW)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Count shows few women as National Magazine Award finalists

The announcement of the 2012 National Magazine Award finalists drew attention this week, not for the finalists themselves but for those who were missing.

Ann Friedman pointed out that no women were listed among finalists for the American Society of Magazine Editors’ awards in the reporting, feature writing, profile writing, essays and criticism, columns and commentary categories. However, women were the majority of candidates for the public interest, personal service and fiction categories, in other words, two those three categories are “servicey” (as Friedman noted) and most of the articles that were nominated are on “women’s issues,” such as body image (including an article on getting a “mommy tuck”), relationship or sexual violence, or specific women’s health issues like breast cancer.

This provoked a number of posts and commentary. Alyssa Rosenberg at Think Progress pointed out the fact that the awards include a women’s magazine category but no men’s magazine category, meaning men’s mags are included as general interest. References were also made to VIDA’s annual byline count, which has shown male authors dominating the space in top magazines. Said VIDA’s Erin Belieu in an interview with Mother Jones, “The National Magazine Awards have sent a pretty clear message… When it comes to a career in journalism, chicks should stick to writing about chicks.”

Meanwhile, Brooke Hatfield started an #ASSME hashtag on Twitter in an effort to point out quality work by women in 2011. Here are some examples:

All of this drew a response from Sid Holt, the chief executive of ASME, who explained the selection process and called the criticisms “kind of silly,” according to Poynter. He also identified women who have been in nominated in recent years. Rosenberg reported that Holt did acknowledge that the questioned women’s magazine category has been a “subject of debate” and explained the reasoning behind it.

Read commentaries on women and the awards as well as the judging process in the articles below:

What do you think of the lack of women finalists in major award categories? Are counts like this important? What do they mean? Share your thoughts in the comment section below.