Women in journalism: Reading list for 8/11/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Women know more than just love and sex (Salon)

Twitter bomb threats: Online and offline, female journalists face abuse “all the time” (Thomson Reuters Foundation)

Why are op-eds written by women more prone to verge on the personal? (The Guardian)

‘NewsHour’ Appoints First Female Anchor Team (New York Times)

Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff Named Co-Anchors, Managing Editors of PBS NewsHour (PBS NewsHour)

Q&A: Nadia Sharmeen on journalists in Bangladesh (Committee to Protect Journalists)

Q&A: CIR video producer, Amanda Pike (ReportHers)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list 8/19/2012

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

First Woman to Moderate Presidential Debate in 20 years (Women’s Media Center) CNN’s Candy Crowley will moderate the second of three presidential debates this fall. See our post on the subject here for a round-up of related links.

For Female Journalists, Another Significant ‘First’ This Election Season On PBS (TV Newser) PBS’s Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff to be the first all-female team to lead a network’s convention coverage

Mexican female journalists suffer from sexual, psychological violence, according to report (Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas)

“Women” and “Journalists”: According to Mike McCurry, One of These Things Is Not Like The Other (National Women’s Law Center)

The media’s ‘happily ever after’: Why are women like Jennifer Aniston portrayed as sad and lonely if they aren’t married? (Columbia Journalism Review)

Meet 3 of Tech’s Foremost Female Founders (Mashable)

How Can Women Gain Influence in Hollywood? (New York Times’ Room for Debate)

Hillary Clinton on Being Asked about Her Clothes (Boston Review)

Cosmo icon Helen Gurley Brown dies at 90 (Poynter)

Longtime TV anchorwoman Kathi Goertzen dies after battle with tumors (Seattle Times)

Protection Demanded After Mexican Human Rights Defender Receives Latest Death Threat (Amnesty International) On journalist Lydia Cacho

Soledad O’Brien’s Amazing John Sununu Interview Should Be Taught in Journalism School (Huffington Post)

Lisa Williams asks, “Do I Really Need to Learn How to Program?” (New Media Women in the News)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Presidential debates: First female moderator in 20 years announced

For the first time in 20 years, a woman will moderate a presidential debate.

It was confirmed Monday that CNN’s Candy Crowley will moderate the second of three presidential debates this fall. A woman, Martha Raddatz of ABC, will also moderate the vice-presidential debate.

Candy Crowley
(Click on the photo to learn more)

The first and last time a woman moderated a presidential debate was former ABC News anchor Carole Simpson in 1992. A woman has hosted vice-presidential debates in that time — PBS’s Gwen Ifill in 2004 and 2008.

The Commission on Presidential Debates fell under scrutiny for this lack of female moderators when three teens, Emma Axelrod, Sammi Siegel and Elena Tsemberis, campaigned to end the 20 year drought via Change.org petitions (see here and here) that collectively garnered more than 180,000 signatures. They had tried to deliver their petition to the CPD, but had been turned away. However, their effort gained support from a number of high profile politicians, such as U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney. Simpson herself also spoke out on the issue in an op-ed for the Boston Globe.

Following the release of the names of this year’s moderators, the girls announced victory on their main petition’s website.

“Through this campaign, millions of Americans learned that two decades passed without a woman moderating a U.S. presidential debate,” Axelrod said in the statement. “We are so proud to have helped educate Americans on this issue, and are extremely happy that women and girls watching the debates this year will see a potential role model up on the stage moderating.”

The announcement definitely demonstrated a step in the right direction.Several write-ups and Twitter comments on the moderator selections were quick to note gender parity with two women among this year’s four moderators. In addition to Crowley and Raddatz, Jim Lehrer of PBS News Hour (who has been a frequent moderator) and Bob Schieffer of CBS News will each moderate a presidential debate.

While this would seem to be an even split, it may not be actual parity. As The Caucus blog noted, “the announcement still fell short of some expectations.” According to the debate format descriptions, both Lehrer and Schieffer will moderate the two traditional debates at the highest level. In these debates, the moderator selects the topics and questions. In contrast, Crowley will host the only town-hall style debate in which citizens will ask questions of the candidates and the moderator will “facilitate discussion.” And, as previously noted, Raddatz is hosting the vice-presidential debate. In other words, the two debates between the highest level candidates where the moderator has the most influence and say will still be moderated by men.

And while gender diversity may be accounted for in this year’s line up, Eric Deggans has noted that the debates will have no non-white moderators for the first time since 1996.

Read more about the moderator announcement in the write-ups below:

Women in journalism: Reading list 7/29/2012

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Women Journalists In The Eye Of The Storm (AWID)

Women Missing from Emmy Nominations (Women’s Media Center)

Radio Gives Voice to India’s Transgender Community (Global Press Institute)

Jessica Ghawi scholarship raises more than $30,000 in a day (Poynter)

Debate over new Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer reveals divide between women in media and tech (Poynter)

One Woman’s Quest to ‘Change the Ratio’ in Tech (Mashable)

Silicon Valley Boot Camp Aims To Boost Diversity (NPR)

Feminism 2.0: How Jessica Valenti is Changing the Conversation (Forbes)

Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff to Make TV History (XX Factor)

Barbara Roessner named Hearst Connecticut Newspapers executive editor (JimRomenesko.com)

Newsweek/The Daily Beast Promotes Several Staffers (Fish Bowl NY) Chelsie Gosk promoted to senior director of digital strategy and audience development; Joyce Tang named deputy editor of Newsweek’s iPad and tablet editions

Norah O’Donnell Replacing Erica Hill on ‘CBS This Morning’ (TV Newser)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.