Women in journalism: Reading list for 4/27/2014

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism, media and technology during the past week, as well as articles related to the intersections of gender, race, class, nationality, ability, and sexual orientation and the media. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

Where the Women Are: Measuring Female Leadership in the New Journalism Ecology (Meg Heckman)

Opinion: The Media Has a Woman Problem (New York Times)

Russian Politician Bullies Female Journalists (VIDEO) (The World Post)

Female in Gaza (New York Times)

3 Pitfalls To Avoid When Talking About Race (NPR)

Imagining a misogyny-free internet (GenderIT.org)

Journalism’s hiring transparency problem (Columbia Journalism Review)

Journalism’s hiring transparency problem

FBomb Joins Women’s Media Center (WMC)

Cosmopolitan.com hires Jill Filipovic, burnishes feminist cred (Capital New York)

Jill Abramson on Leaning In, Leadership & Legacy (Gotham Mag)

Call for Proposals: Alexia Foundation 2014 Women’s Initiative Grant – See more at: http://mediastorm.com/blog/2014/04/04/call-for-proposals-alexia-foundation-2014-womens-initiative-grant/#sthash.fW8ULB29.dpufCall
Call for Proposals: Alexia Foundation 2014 Women’s Initiative Grant – See more at: http://mediastorm.com/blog/2014/04/04/call-for-proposals-alexia-foundation-2014-womens-initiative-grant/#sthash.fW8ULB29.dpuf
Call for Proposals: Alexia Foundation 2014 Women’s Initiative Grant – See more at: http://mediastorm.com/blog/2014/04/04/call-for-proposals-alexia-foundation-2014-womens-initiative-grant/#sthash.fW8ULB29.dpuf

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

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Women in journalism: Reading list for 6/9/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

 

Reading List

New York Times Teases Female Politicians For Relying On ‘Purse Boys’ (Think Progress)

-The Real Problem With Writing About a Senator’s Purse (XX Factor)

Is It Media Hype Or Would Electing The First Woman Mayor Of Paris Mean Something For France? (Forbes Woman)

Silicon Valley’s Awful Race and Gender Problem in 3 Mind-Blowing Charts (Mother Jones)

Sunday Morning TV: Same Time, Same Place, Same Guests (Media Report to Women, The Blog)

Web Magazine for Women, by Women (Women in the World)

Journalist Riham Said gives Muslim cleric Yousuf Badri huge serve on national TV (News.com.au)

Answering Harvard’s question about my personal life, 52 years later (Washington Post) – Phyllis Richman, a Washington Post restaurant critic from 1976 to 2000

Samantha Power’s history in journalism (Politico)

Sarah Stillman Wins Top Award at the 2013 MOLLY National Journalism Prize Dinner (Texas Observer)

Politico hires Foreign Policy’s Susan Glasser (Washington Post)

New York Times hires two reporters from the Financial Times (JimRomenesko.com) – One is London-based Alexandra Stevenson

Wendy Ruderman leaves NYT, returns to Philly Daily News (Poynter)

How Rebecca Parker, Editor, Does It (Motherlode)

Rachel Sklar Tries to Become a Social Media Entrepreneur (New York Times)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list 10/28/2012

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

CNN says women vote with their hormones (CJR)

CNN removes story about hormones affecting a woman’s vote (Poynter)

Women from Azerbaijan, Gaza, Ethiopia win courage in journalism awards (Washington Post)

CNN’s Suzanne Malveaux talks with Pakistani journalist Zubeida Mustafa about being the only woman in her newsroom (CNN)

-A Mother’s Blog and a Nanny’s Absence Online: How Digital Reporting Changes How We Understand the Krim Murders (XX Factor)

Women’s sport is underfunded and ignored, charity claims (Guardian)

After college, pay gender gap begins for most grads — but not communications major (Poynter)

Revised study: White journalists wrote 93% of front page presidential election stories, but… (Poynter)

Erin Andrews Receives Death Threats From Strange Twitter Troll (Mashable)

Monday Q&A: Pulitzer-winner Sara Ganim on working the crime beat in the digital age (Nieman Journalism Lab)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Presidential debates: First female moderator in 20 years announced

For the first time in 20 years, a woman will moderate a presidential debate.

It was confirmed Monday that CNN’s Candy Crowley will moderate the second of three presidential debates this fall. A woman, Martha Raddatz of ABC, will also moderate the vice-presidential debate.

Candy Crowley
(Click on the photo to learn more)

The first and last time a woman moderated a presidential debate was former ABC News anchor Carole Simpson in 1992. A woman has hosted vice-presidential debates in that time — PBS’s Gwen Ifill in 2004 and 2008.

The Commission on Presidential Debates fell under scrutiny for this lack of female moderators when three teens, Emma Axelrod, Sammi Siegel and Elena Tsemberis, campaigned to end the 20 year drought via Change.org petitions (see here and here) that collectively garnered more than 180,000 signatures. They had tried to deliver their petition to the CPD, but had been turned away. However, their effort gained support from a number of high profile politicians, such as U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney. Simpson herself also spoke out on the issue in an op-ed for the Boston Globe.

Following the release of the names of this year’s moderators, the girls announced victory on their main petition’s website.

“Through this campaign, millions of Americans learned that two decades passed without a woman moderating a U.S. presidential debate,” Axelrod said in the statement. “We are so proud to have helped educate Americans on this issue, and are extremely happy that women and girls watching the debates this year will see a potential role model up on the stage moderating.”

The announcement definitely demonstrated a step in the right direction.Several write-ups and Twitter comments on the moderator selections were quick to note gender parity with two women among this year’s four moderators. In addition to Crowley and Raddatz, Jim Lehrer of PBS News Hour (who has been a frequent moderator) and Bob Schieffer of CBS News will each moderate a presidential debate.

While this would seem to be an even split, it may not be actual parity. As The Caucus blog noted, “the announcement still fell short of some expectations.” According to the debate format descriptions, both Lehrer and Schieffer will moderate the two traditional debates at the highest level. In these debates, the moderator selects the topics and questions. In contrast, Crowley will host the only town-hall style debate in which citizens will ask questions of the candidates and the moderator will “facilitate discussion.” And, as previously noted, Raddatz is hosting the vice-presidential debate. In other words, the two debates between the highest level candidates where the moderator has the most influence and say will still be moderated by men.

And while gender diversity may be accounted for in this year’s line up, Eric Deggans has noted that the debates will have no non-white moderators for the first time since 1996.

Read more about the moderator announcement in the write-ups below: