Women in journalism: Reading list for 8/4/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List*

In many college newsrooms, women hold top leadership roles (Poynter)

Are the challenges faced by women journalists changing for the better? (Chicago Reader)

Misogyny Trips Twitter; Will It Reverse Silicon Valley Sexism? (Huffington Post)

Tech Weekly Podcast: Violence against women in the digital realm (The Guardian)

-Pakistan: Women in journalism: Harassed at work  (The Express Tribune)

In Costa Rica, women working with technology in journalism learn how to thrive (International Center for Journalists)

Changing the conversation about women’s bodies (CNN) On the new Interrupt magazine

CNN Had Four Women Discuss Something Other Than Weddings & Babies (Jezebel)

Site counts male, female bylines in New York Times (Poynter)

Woman Falls 17 Stories to Her Death; AP Implies She Deserved It (XX Factor)

Gender Ratios of 65th Emmy Nominees Favor Men (Women’s Media Center)

Report: Female reporters advised to have escort for interviewing Filner as third accuser comes forward (Hot Air)

Good Jill, Bad Jill: Executive Editor Jill Abramson, Queen of The New York Times (Newsweek)

Q&A: Ruby Cramer, political reporter at BuzzFeed (Columbia Journalism Review)

Q&A: Education Reporter, Regina Medina (ReportHers)

CNN Foreign Affairs Correspondent Jill Dougherty Leaving The Channel After 30 Years (TV Newser)

Amy Powell to Run Paramount’s TV Division (The Wrap)

*Note: Due to travel, this week’s (slightly delayed) list contains noteworthy links from the past two weeks. No Reading List was posted for the week of 7/28/2013.

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list for 7/14/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

The Honorable ‘Girlie’ Senator From The State Of New York (NPR Ombudsman)

NPR’s ombudsman asks for guidelines how to fairly cover women politicians. We have some. (Name It. Change It.)

Should you mention her shoes? Maybe. (by Meg Heckman)

Quick Profile Comparisons (Flip The News)

Wired’s profile of Google engineer leads with anecdotes about her wardrobe (Poynter)

REPORT: The Sunday Morning Shows Are Still White, Conservative, And Male (Media Matters)

Against All Odds, Female Reporters Lead in Syria (Daily Beast)

Photography Exhibition Challenges Stereotypes of Women in Sri Lanka (Global Press Institute)

ESPN To Air Documentary on Women Sports Journalists Who Fought for Professional Access and Treatment (Media Report to Women, the Blog)

The First Female CEO of a Television Network Offers a Springboard for Other Women (Huffington Post)

The Times’s New Culture Club: Young female foursome tapped to lead arts coverage (New York Observer)

Forbes Exec Meredith Levien Tapped For Top Advertising Job At New York Times (Forbes)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

Women in journalism: Reading list for 6/9/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

 

Reading List

New York Times Teases Female Politicians For Relying On ‘Purse Boys’ (Think Progress)

-The Real Problem With Writing About a Senator’s Purse (XX Factor)

Is It Media Hype Or Would Electing The First Woman Mayor Of Paris Mean Something For France? (Forbes Woman)

Silicon Valley’s Awful Race and Gender Problem in 3 Mind-Blowing Charts (Mother Jones)

Sunday Morning TV: Same Time, Same Place, Same Guests (Media Report to Women, The Blog)

Web Magazine for Women, by Women (Women in the World)

Journalist Riham Said gives Muslim cleric Yousuf Badri huge serve on national TV (News.com.au)

Answering Harvard’s question about my personal life, 52 years later (Washington Post) – Phyllis Richman, a Washington Post restaurant critic from 1976 to 2000

Samantha Power’s history in journalism (Politico)

Sarah Stillman Wins Top Award at the 2013 MOLLY National Journalism Prize Dinner (Texas Observer)

Politico hires Foreign Policy’s Susan Glasser (Washington Post)

New York Times hires two reporters from the Financial Times (JimRomenesko.com) – One is London-based Alexandra Stevenson

Wendy Ruderman leaves NYT, returns to Philly Daily News (Poynter)

How Rebecca Parker, Editor, Does It (Motherlode)

Rachel Sklar Tries to Become a Social Media Entrepreneur (New York Times)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.

On Politico and the criticism of Jill Abramson

Politico ruffled some feathers this week when it published a piece on Jill Abramson, executive editor of The New York Times, that had many questioning whether the story would have been written if she was a man.

This piece published by Politico on Tuesday about New York Times' editor Jill Abramson set off a wave of criticism.
This piece published by Politico on Tuesday about New York Times’ editor Jill Abramson set off a wave of criticism.

The “Turbulence at The Times” story, written by Politico’s Dylan Byers and relying heavily on anonymous sources, argues that the Times’ first female executive editor is “on the verge of losing the support of the newsroom.” She is described throughout the piece as “brusque,” “condescending,” “uncaring,” and “blunt,” though “few doubt her wisdom or her experience.” According to the article, she has a “nasal car honk” voice and she travels a lot (often she’s required). And once she told an editor to change a home page photo in the middle of a meeting by stating, “I don’t know why you’re still here. If I were you, I would leave now and change the photo.”

Many took Politico to task via Twitter and other platforms regarding the perceived sexism of the piece. Twitter comments included those from writer Lisa McIntire who said, “I struggle to find any specific behavior of Abramson’s that is critiqued here other than the tone of her voice” and feminist author Jessica Valentia who said, “This breathtakingly sexist Politico article does all but accuse Jill Abramson of attracting bears with her period” (See there other Twitter comments here and here). Hanna Rosin, writing for Slate, argued that the piece is “pretty thin” and “possibly sexist.” Emily Bell in the Guardian wrote, “The lame nature of the reporting suggests it might be better just to ignore the piece entirely, but it deserves attention, as it fuels an exasperating and wholly sexist narrative about women in power.”

Some have pointed out that numerous Times’ (male) editors have been criticized over the years. Byers responded to some of the criticism (specifically Bell’s) and stated that he “spoke with more than a dozen staffers from across the newsroom, male and female, old and young. They all voiced similar complaints, and said that those complaints were deeply felt and widespread.”

However, the difference with this piece, as Jessica Bennett argues on Jezebel, is that it’s not a story about her competence, but instead is about her “likability” in a leadership position. Several authors pointed to research in Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s new book, Lean In, that talks about how for women success and likeability are negatively correlated. For women in leadership, this “double bind” plays out often, Sandberg writes on page 41 of her book, “When a woman excels at her job, both male and female coworkers will remark that she may be accomplishing a lot but is ‘not well-liked’ by her peers.”

Sandberg and others point to the Heidi/Howard case study which found that just changing the name (and, therefore, the sex) of the leader described altered people’s perceptions – he was more appealing and she was selfish and “not the type of person you would want to hire or work for” (Sandberg, p. 40). As a result, many questioned whether the same story would have been written or if Abramson would be perceived the same way if her name were “Joe” or “Jack” instead of “Jill.” (For an interesting piece comparing descriptions, see Ann Friedman’s “If Jill Abramson where a man…“).

Also in response to Politico’s piece, media critic Erik Wemple published an equally sourced piece arguing that Politico’s “men’s club” has its own gender issues to worry about.

As for Abramson herself, in an email sent to Rosin she responded by sharing her horoscope from the day of the article, “You will need to put on a brave face today, especially if you get news that seems to be the opposite of what you were hoping to hear. The important word there is “seems,” because most likely it IS good news after all.”

Here is a round-up of articles on Politico’s piece:

Politico: NYT Boss Lady Too Bossy (Women’s Media Center)

Jill Abramson: ‘Very Unpopular’ Or Just Doing Her Job? (Huffington Post)

Politico’s ‘turbulence’ story about New York Times’ Jill Abramson: All wind (Poynter)

More reactions to Politico’s ‘Turbulence at The Times’ story (Poynter)

Jill Abramson and the wholly sexist narrative of the woman in power (Guardian)

You Don’t Know Jill: Politico’s story about New York Times editor Jill Abramson is wrong and possibly sexist (Slate)

If Jill Abramson were a man… (by Ann Friedman)

What If Jill Abramson Were Joe? (Jezebel)

Reporting on industry gossip: How Politico should have reported the “turbulence” at The New York Times (Columbia Journalism Review)

Newsroom B*tches, An Appreciation (by Debra PIckett)

The double bind for Jill Abramson and other women at the top (Washington Post)

Can Politico spot gender issues? (by Erik Wemple at the Washington Post)

Women in journalism: Reading list 4/7/2013

The Gender Report provides a weekly round-up of links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. The links below are to noteworthy articles on topics related to women in journalism and the media during the past week. Articles included in this feature do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gender Report or its writers. View past week’s round-ups here.

Reading List

National Magazine Award: Year of the Woman (Finally) (Mother Jones)

Awful New York Times Obit for Rocket Scientist Rhapsodizes About Her Beef Stroganoff (Jezebel)

To avoid sexism, follow AP style: The New York Times would have dodged a headache in its Yvonne Brill obituary (Columbia Journalism Review)

Imprisoned Ethiopian journalist Reeyot Alemu threatened with solitary confinement; denied urgently needed medical care (International Women’s Media Foundation)

Quotas get results: A chat with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes on tapping sources more diverse than the usual pool of white dudes (Columbia Journalism Review)

Race for the Prize: On Nellie Bly and Elizabeth Bisland (Los Angeles Review of Books)

9 Real-Life Lessons Learned From Chick-Flick Journalists (Refinery 29)

We encourage readers to submit suggestions of articles to include in future editions of this feature by sending an email to genderreport[at]gmail.com. For links to articles like these throughout the week, follow @GenderReport on Twitter.